Do you agree with this statement? Is this a story that, while difficult to hear, must be told to children? In thinking about this question and what children can handle, you might consider looking back to the Bettelheim reading from Unit 2.

Do you agree with this statement? Is this a story that, while difficult to hear, must be told to children? In thinking about this question and what children can handle, you might consider looking back to the Bettelheim reading from Unit 2..

Readings & Materials (with the exception of Zickuhr’s work, one copy of each picturebook is available in the CSDL; copy must be used in the CSDL—may not be taken home):

-Toshi Maruki, Hiroshima No Pika (The Flash of Hiroshima)

-Maurice Sendak, Where the Wild Things Are

-Shel Silverstein, The Giving Tree

-Dr. Seuss, The Sneetches

-Javaka Steptoe, Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat

In the “About This Book” section at the end of Hiroshima No Pika, Maruki writes, “It is very difficult to tell young people about something very bad that happened, in the hope that their knowing will keep it from happening again.” Do you agree with this statement? Is this a story that, while difficult to hear, must be told to children? In thinking about this question and what children can handle, you might consider looking back to the Bettelheim reading from Unit 2.

The post Do you agree with this statement? Is this a story that, while difficult to hear, must be told to children? In thinking about this question and what children can handle, you might consider looking back to the Bettelheim reading from Unit 2. appeared first on Essay Quoll.

Do you agree with this statement? Is this a story that, while difficult to hear, must be told to children? In thinking about this question and what children can handle, you might consider looking back to the Bettelheim reading from Unit 2.

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