Social and Emotional Wellbeing and Connectedness

Module 1: Social and Emotional Wellbeing and Connectedness
Look at the Social and Emotional Wellbeing wheel and think about your own relationship to each of these connection points: body; mind and emotions; family and kinship; community; culture; country; spirit, spirituality and ancestors. Thinking about the concept of social and emotional wellbeing, discuss with the group how these understandings might change the way someone works within the discipline of mental health?

Figure 4.2 (pg 63 of main text)

Module 2: Transgenerational and Intergenerational Trauma
Discuss some possible causes and effects of trauma, especially in the context of the Stolen Generation. How would you best support clients, families, or communities in this situation.

Module 3: Reconciliation and Over-representation
What does Reconciliation mean to you? There is an over-representation of young Aboriginal people in the justice system. Reflect with the group on the factors that may cause behavioural and emotional problems in Aboriginal youth and discuss possible interventions and prevention methods.

Module 4: Indigenous/Indigenist Research Methodologies

The Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) has created the Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies (GERAIS) to ensure that research with and about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples follows a process of meaningful engagement and reciprocity between the researcher and the individuals and/or communities involved in the research (https://aiatsis.gov.au/sites/default/files/docs/research-and-guides/ethics/gerais.pdf). Discuss with the group why this was necessary?

Readings
Module 1

• Dudgeon, P., Milroy, Helen, Walker, Roz, Australia. Department of the Prime Minister Cabinet, Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, & Kulunga Research Network. (2014). Working together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and wellbeing principles and practice (2nd ed.).
Chapter 4: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social and Emotional Wellbeing, pp. 55 – 68.
Chapter 5: Evolving Policy Context in Mental Health and Wellbeing, pp. 69 – 90.
Chapter 6: Social Determinants of Social and Emotional Wellbeing, pp. 93 112.

Module 2

• Dudgeon, P., Milroy, Helen, Walker, Roz, Australia. Department of the Prime Minister Cabinet, Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, & Kulunga Research Network. (2014). Working together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and wellbeing principles and practice (2nd ed.).
Chapter 17: Addressing Individual and Community Transgenerational Trauma, pp. 289 – 306.
Chapter 21: Understanding the lives of Aboriginal Children and Families, pp. 373 – 382.
Chapter 29: The Marumali Program: Healing for Stolen Generation, pp. 493 – 508.
• Wilson, A.M., Magarey, A.M., Jones, M., O’Donnell, K. and J Kelly, J. (2015). Attitudes and characteristics of health professionals working in Aboriginal health. Rural and Remote Health. 15: 2739, pp 1-14.
• Why me? : stolen generations, Rick Cavaggion filmmaker.; Martin Gordon filmmaker.; Ronin Films production company; Kanopy (Firm) distributor :2007 (in library via Kanopy Streaming Video)
• Dudgeon, P., Milroy, Helen, Walker, Roz, Australia. Department of the Prime Minister Cabinet, Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, & Kulunga Research Network. (2014). Working together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and wellbeing principles and practice (2nd ed.).
Chapter 1: Aboriginal Social, Cultural and Historical Contexts
Chapter 2: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health; Overview

• Davis, A., & Gentlewarrior, S. (2015). White Privilege and Clinical Social Work Practice: Reflections and Recommendations. Journal of Progressive Human Services, 26(3), 191-208.
• Sherwood, J. (2013). Colonisation – It’s bad for your health: The context of Aboriginal health. Contemporary Nurse: A Journal for the Nursing Profession, 46(1), 28-40.
• Walter, M., Taylor, S., & Habibis, D. (2011). How white is social work in Australia? Australian Social Work, 64(1), 6-19.Contemporary Nurse: A Journal for the Nursing Profession, 46(1), 28-40.

Module 3

• Dudgeon, P., Milroy, Helen, Walker, Roz, Australia. Department of the Prime Minister Cabinet, Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, & Kulunga Research Network. (2014). Working together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and wellbeing principles and practice (2nd ed.).
Chapter 11: Introduction to National Standards for the Mental Health workforce. pp. 181 – 194.
Chapter 12: Cultural Competence – Transforming Policy, Services, Programs and Practice. pp. 195 – 220.
• Derring, S., Spangaro, J., Lauw, M., & McNamara, L. (2013). The intersection of trauma, racism, and cultural competence in effective work with aboriginal people: Waiting for trust.Australian Social Work, 66(1), 104-117.
• Wilson, A (2014). Addressing Uncomfortable Issues: Reflexivity as a Tool for Culturally Safe Practice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health. The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education. 43:2, pp 218–230.
• McDermott, D., & Gabb, D. (2008). How do you teach “Cultural Safety/Cultural Competence/Cultural Ease”. In Psychology and Indigenous Australians: Teaching, Practice and Theory. Second Annual Conference, University of South Australia.